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Ongoing Admissions

We are accepting applications for Fall 2017. For information, call or email Shelley Morgan, Director of Admissions.

About Waring
Mission & Philosophy

Diversity Statement

Waring School: A Case for Diversity and Cultural Proficiency

Cultural proficiency is a mind-set, a worldview, a way a person or an organization makes assumptions for effectively describing, responding to, and planning for issues that arise in diverse environments. For some people, cultural proficiency is a paradigm shift from viewing cultural differences as problematic to learning how to interact effectively with other cultures.1
At Waring, we believe that cultural proficiency is inherent to our mission and raises the bar for lifelong learning. We believe that by its very nature learning cannot happen in isolation; learning requires students to be part of a diverse community which actively encourages them to begin a lifelong engagement with cultural proficiency. Research shows that when students interact with peers different from themselves, they exert more intellectual effort and expand their horizons. A diverse school is therefore essential to promoting the high academic expectations central to Waring’s mission. We strive to be a school of ideas; a richer diversity of ideas and voices makes that endeavor both more effective and more meaningful. We also work to cultivate the analytical mind and expressive voice, investigating the whole human experience to better understand ourselves in the context of a diverse world.

Waring School has celebrated different points of view from the time of its founding, and we recognize that Waring currently represents diverse viewpoints, be these cultural, political, philosophical or religious. We strive, every day and as a part of our ethic, to be a school inclusive of many ideas, and as one practical means to that end, we have long supported students of diverse socio-economic backgrounds through financial aid. All the same, a more diverse Waring School will enrich our learning environment, open up the community to different modes of thinking, living, and expression, and make our ongoing discussion of inclusion even more meaningful.

Waring students are becoming citizens of a more global community. Not only must we  prepare students for such citizenry, but we must strive to bring the Waring Way to a broader community. Waring students, teachers and alumni have travelled to Taktse School in Sikkim, done an Endterm in Martinique, studied civil rights in Alabama, and worked with students in urban area schools. There is much more travel on our horizon.

To these ends, we have formed a diversity committee comprised of board members, faculty, parents and citizens of the greater community. We have made diversity a priority in our admissions office and are also actively recruiting diverse faculty members and trustees.  In order to raise funds for scholarship, we are directing a large percentage of Major Gift donations between 2015-2017 toward scholarships, and will carry this directive over into a capital campaign by 2017 to allow for endowed scholarships for all families who need support. The Class of 2015 Scholarship Fund is a testament to the students’ commitment to make Waring more diverse. In the next five years, our goal is to have at least 10-15% students of color as well as a more diverse faculty and board of trustees. Additionally, Waring will continue to strive to have greater socio-economic diversity in our student body as well as to be inclusive of diverse ideologies, beliefs and cultural traditions.

A schoolwide commitment to cultural proficiency through discussion groups, professional development, and well-chosen readings and speakers will help us be tolerant, open, and authentic in this most important, ongoing endeavor. The Waring Way is a culture but it is also a pathway; we believe this is a necessary next step in our journey.
1 Janice Clymer and Anthony Moyer, naesp.org